Frances Remote Views Prehistoric Romeo and Juliet

It was a very sad and romantic way to die for lovers…It will be interesting to see if the science of this discovery validates the blow to the back of her head or neck. I do not remember the sequence of events in Romeo and Juliet but it would be interesting if there are some similarities to the sequence of injuries.
There are no coincidences
 

  According to ABC News:
It could be humanity’s oldest story of doomed love. Archaeologists have unearthed two skeletons from the Neolithic period locked in a tender embrace and buried outside Mantua, just 25 miles south of Verona, the romantic city where Shakespeare set the star-crossed tale of “Romeo and Juliet.”
 

 
Causality not coincidence      

The “coincidence” has an explanation in metaphysics, the study of first cause. The answer, explanation for the only embracing skeleton couple found in history near where the city that was the setting for Romeo and Juliet, is magnetic resonance. Emotions have a magnetic quality to them and an emotion or emotional event will draw to it emotions or events of the same resonance.

Spiritual Feng Shui
Love that ends tragically has a resonance that remains not only in your aura but also in the spaces where the emotions were felt. It is not surprising that the embracing couple was found there and it is possible that their emotions of love and premature death were the basis for the energies, thoughts and thougtforms for Romeo and Juliet.
Italy mystery of prehistoric hug
Archaeologists in Italy have unearthed two skeletons thought to be 5,000 to 6,000 years old, locked in an embrace. 
The pair from the Neolithic period were discovered outside Mantua, about 40km (25 miles) south of Verona. 
The pair, almost certainly a man and a woman, are thought to have died young as their teeth were mostly intact, said chief archaeologist Elena Menotti. 
The burial site was discovered on Monday during construction work for a factory building. 

Hugging
“It’s an extraordinary case,” said Ms Menotti. “There has not been a double burial found in the Neolithic period, much less two people hugging – and they really are hugging,” she told Reuters news agency.
Flint tools, including arrowheads and a knife, were also found alongside the couple.
Scientists will now study the skeletons and artefacts to work out how and when the two people died, Ms Menotti said.
“I must say that when we discovered it, we all became very excited,” she said.

“I’ve been doing this job for 25 years. I’ve done digs at Pompeii, all the famous sites, but I’ve never been so moved because this is the discovery of something special,” she said.